Long time, no see.

Hey y’all,

It’s been a long time since I used this blog, but I’m betting some of you will still get a notice that I posted in your email. I just wanted to emphasize that we have a really good teacher development opportunity coming up with the Library of Congress. Here’s how Matt described it in an e-mail:

“The first one is titled “Teaching with Primary Sources.” It focuses on the Library of Congress’ online resources (see attached flyer) and it will be held over a two-day period, from October 26 (Fri.) to October 27 (Sat.). This workshop will be held in the Music Classroom 154 in the Art/Music Building at CSU-Pueblo from 12-5 PM on Friday and 9-5 PM on Saturday. If you’re interested in this terrific learning opportunity, please contact Alysse McCanna in the History Department office to secure your spot. Lunch will be served. If you have specific questions about the workshop, please contact Dr. Jonathan Rees.”

Drop me an e-mail if you’re interested. I’m sure you can find my address somewhere.

Another fantastic post…

from Scouting New York.

Saratoga Teaching Materials.

Like so many national parks, Saratoga has a lot of excellent teaching materials online.

Free historical games.

Not related to the trip, but as you’re teachers you might want to check this out.

The Cardiff Giant.

Here’s the whole story of the Cardiff Giant from the Museum of Hoaxes:

The Cardiff Giant, a gigantic ten-foot tall stone man, emerged out of the ground and into American life on October 16, 1869, when he was discovered by some workers digging a well behind the barn of William C. “Stub” Newell in Cardiff, New York. Word of his presence quickly spread, and soon thousands of people were making the journey out to Stub Newell’s farm to see the colossus. Even when Newell began charging fifty cents a head to have a look at it, people still kept coming.

Speculation ran rampant over what the giant might be. The central debate was between those who thought it was a petrified man and those who believed it to be an ancient statue. The ‘petrifactionists’ theorized that it was one of the giants mentioned in the Bible, Genesis 6:4, where it says, “There were giants in the earth in those days.” Those who promoted the statue theory followed the lead of Dr. John F. Boynton, who speculated that a Jesuit missionary had carved it sometime during the seventeenth century to impress the local indians.

The truth was somewhat more prosaic. It was actually the creation of an enterprising New York tobacconist named George Hull. The idea of burying a stone giant in the ground occurred to him after he got into an argument with a methodist Reverend about whether the Bible should be taken literally. Hull, an atheist, didn’t think it should. But the Reverend disagreed. The Reverend insisted that even the passage where it says ‘there were giants in the earth in those days’ should be read as a literal fact. According to Hull, after this discussion he immediately “thought of making a stone, and passing it off as a petrified man.” He figured he could not only use the fake giant to poke fun at Biblical literalists, but also make some money.

Read the rest if you don’t know it. The story is awesome.

The trip to New York (city and state) awards!

It’s time for the trip to New York (city and state) awards! Nominations are being taken in the following categories:

1. Best site.

2. Best presenter.

3. Most interesting historical fact.

4. Craziest teacher.

5. Best meal.

Or any other category you feel like creating! Do your nominating in the comments below.

Blogging from the bus.

Which of the stops on today’s whirlwind tour was your favorite and why?

PS Buses with wifi are really quite amazing.